Asen, iron altars of the Fon people of Benin October 2-December 21, 1985, Emory University, Museum of Art and Archaeology, Michael C. Carlos Hall, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia by Edna G. Bay

Cover of: Asen, iron altars of the Fon people of Benin | Edna G. Bay

Published by The Museum in Atlanta, Ga .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • Benin

Subjects:

  • Altars, Fon -- Benin -- Exhibitions.,
  • Ironwork, Fon -- Benin -- Exhibitions.,
  • Fon (African people) -- Religion -- Exhibitions.

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 47.

Book details

StatementEdna G. Bay.
ContributionsEmory University. Museum of Art and Archaeology.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsNK8289.6.D3 B39 1985
The Physical Object
Pagination48 p. :
Number of Pages48
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2652592M
LC Control Number85234869

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Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin Paperback – January 1, by Edna G. Bay (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" — — — Paperback from $ 1 Collectible from $ Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link Author: Edna G.

Bay. : Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin: Tan & color illus. iron altars of the Fon people of Benin book stapled wraps, 48 pp., many BW illus. Issued in conjunction with a series of exhbiitions showcasing the asen, the monuments to the dead, of families living in Benin, West Africa.

An illustrated essay by Edna G. Bay, and many examples of the asen she encountered. Asen Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benen by Edna Bay (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The digit and digit formats both work. Get this from a library. Asen: iron altars of the Fon people of Benin.

[Edna G Bay; Emory University. Museum of Art and Archaeology.; Grinter Galleries.; Anniston Museum of Natural Iron altars of the Fon people of Benin book. Asen, Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin: October 2-DecemEmory University, Museum of Art and Archaeology, Michael C.

Carlos Hall, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia Edna G. Bay The Museum, - Altars, Fon - 48 pages. Iron altars of the Fon people of Benin book this from a library.

Asen, iron altars of the Fon people of Benin: October 2-DecemEmory University, Museum of Art and Archaeology, Michael C. Carlos Hall, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. [Edna G Bay; Emory University. Museum of Art and Archaeology.]. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more.

Asen, iron altars of the Fon people of Benin: October 2-DecemEmory University Museum of Art and Archaeology in SearchWorks catalog. For the Fon people of Benin the chameleon is a symbolic of transformity due to its ability to change color.

This marvelously crafted altar staff was created in the early 20th century by a Fon blacksmith in Ouidah, the infamous slave port, for the practice of the region’s dominant religion Vodun. Asen, Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin.

Georgia: Emory University / EUR / Altar, "asen"Fon, BeninMit Sockel / with baseEisen, Textil. Much of our understanding of Fon asen comes from Edna G.

Bay’s seminal catalog, Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin, in which she presents a well-documented, though largely ahistorical, analysis of these iron sculp‐ tural staffs used for memorializing the dead.

Bay’s new book on the subject traces the history of asen. Among the Fon people of the coastal city of Ouidah in Benin, master artists created a distinguished style of altars known as d from forged iron, they comprise a tall rod that supports a large cone-shaped platform that holds forged and cutout iron figurines commemorating the persons for whose spirit they were intended.

BAY, E, Asen, iron altars of the fon people of Benin, October 2 - Decem Emory University Museum of Art & Archaeology, 48 p, ill, 26 cm MAUPOIL, B, La géomancie à l'ancienne Côte des Esclaves, Paris, Institut d'Ethnologie, p, planches.

Ancestral altar (asen)Fon peoples, Republic of BéninNarrated by lead curator Tom JoycePhotograph by Tom Joyce, Hountondji Compound, Republic of Bénin, FON ASEN STAFFS.

All of these pieces have been vetted as authentic and show signs of use and age. Among the Fon people of Benin extended families kept large staffs crafted out of iron in family altars housed in a small building in the courtyard of the family compound that were tended by elder woman in.

Fon society of southern Benin today reflects the meeting of cultures over the past years. European influences mix with Yoruba contributions and those of other peoples in the larger region.

Not surprisingly, asen altars, a sacred art form, reflect the blending and richness of all these cultures. Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin (travelling show), Emory University Museum of Art and Archaeology, October 2 - DecemMuseum of Natural History, Anniston Alabama, January 9 - February 9,Grinter Galleries, Center for African Studies, University of Florida Gainesville, Febrary 17 - Ma |.

Yoruba asen altar AF Iron portable altar made of cut out sheet metal, dedicated to ancestral worship. Fon or Yoruba culture, Benin/Nigeria, West Africa. For details on the use of asen, please visit this extended academic paper.

Early 20th century. 95 cm high. The Changing Face of Asen. Much of our understanding of Fon asen comes from Edna G.

Bay’s seminal catalog, Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin, in which she presents a well-documented, though largely ahistorical, analysis of these iron sculptural staffs used for memorializing the ’s new book on the subject traces the history of asen over more than two hundred years.

FON PEOPLE: BENIN`S EMPIRE BUILDERS OF THE PAST KINGDOM OF DAHOMEY AND AN UNREPENTANT PRACTITIONERS OF VOODOO RELIGION The Fon people also known as Fon nu, are a major West African ethnic and Fon linguistic group in the country of Benin, and southwest are made up of more than 3, people.

Fon is the largest ethnic group in Benin. Altars of the Fon People of Benin (Atlanta: Emory University Museum of Art and Archaeology, ), 93 E.g. Duncan, Travels in Western Africa, 1, 94 Pires, Vicente Ferreira, Viagem de Africa em o Reino de Dahomé (ed. de Lessa, Clado Ribeiro, São Paulo, ), Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin by Edna G.

Bay. Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin by Edna G. Bay (pp. ) The Penguin Book of Southern African Stories by Stephen Gray (pp. ) Review by: Richard Taylor DOI: /   Title: Fon Asen Figure; Date/Period: XXth century; Materials: Iron; Dimension: 7" 1/8; Description: Figure from an asen iron altar.

Asen altars are memorials for the ancestors, unique to the Fon city of Ouidah in Benin. - Asen: iron altars from Ouidah, Republic of Benin, National Museum of African Art, 17/12/ - Guide du Musée d'Abomey, P. Mercier et J. Lombard, Etudes dahoméennes, IFAN, République du Dahomey, - P. Mercier, Les Asé du Musée d'Abomey, IFAN, - Iron altars of the Fon people of Bénin, 2//12/, Emory University Museum.

tion of smiths who make asen, she might have been told that the kidney shape is a rebus that alludes to the name of a branch of a smithing lineage descended from a man named Aisi (Edna Bay, Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin,p.

29). Despite its problems, one comes away from Blier's book with a greater appreciation. This memorial staff, called an asen, was created in the midth century of wrought iron, raffia and wood by artists of the Fon people in the Republic of Benin.

Both Blier and I have written about asen, the portable altars to the dead common in twentieth century southern Dahomey/Benin, which are beginning to draw closer attention from the scholarly and museum communities (Blier, ; Bay Asen Iron, steel, wood, paint.

cm, Dia. 43cm (5'4" x 17") Michael C. Carlos Museum. Asen altar, Fon people, Rep of Benin, e. 20th c, Iron, steel. Warrior figure (dedicated to Gu, deity of war and iron), Fon people midth c, iron, 5'5" Uche Okeke (Nigeria), Owls,pen and ink.

Papa Ibra Tall (senegal), cosmic Vigil,oil on canvas, Collection of the Government of Senegal. - Explore mlise squirrel's board "African art - Fon", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about African art, African, Art pins. Fiction and non-fiction books set completely or at least partially in Benin.

Score A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book. Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin.

Royal Ritual Symbolism in Benin.” Paper presented at the Seminar on Visual Art as Social Commentary in Africa, School of Oriental and African Studies, “ The Blacksmith's Taboos: From the Man of Iron to the Man of Blood.”. Another Fon iron altar asen, from Ouidah The seated figure on the iron disc surrounded by a cross, a vessel on a stand, a chameleon, a palm tree and a pangolin, twelve pendants of hoe form remain about the border 99cm.

high. Rate this book. Clear rating. 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars. Asen, Ancestors, and Vodun: Tracing Change in African Art. avg rating — 3 ratings — published Want to Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin/5(5).

Wood iron gold cloth. Proverbial Staff Asante AKAN, Ghana 19thc Asen staff altar FON People, Dahomey, Republic of Benin iron, cloth, encrustation. Opon Ifa FON People, Dahomey, Republic of Benin. 16thth C. Legba-the FON Eshu Equivilent Square close to.

Bocio. Suzanne Blier's AfricanPsychology, and Power (Chicago, ) was the most complete English-language account of African vodun objects when it was published, based on a summer of fieldwork in Abomey, Benin and nearby discusses the religious artifacts of the Fon people and their neighbors in Benin and Togo, called bocio or bocheaw (empowered bodies) and the.

4 - Asen: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin (October 2 - Decem ) [RESTRICTED] 4 - Liubov Popova: Spatial Force Constructions, (January 15 - Febru ) [RESTRICTED] 4 - The Prints of Barnett Newman (January 15 - March 8, ) [RESTRICTED] 4 - Old Master Prints and Drawings from the Museum Collection (March - Erkunde Michael Altmaiers Pinnwand „Fon Benin“ auf Pinterest.

Weitere Ideen zu Afrikanische kunst, Voodoo zauber, Monster puppen pins. Asen Fon People, Quidah, Republic of Benin Hampton Museum of Art Iron An Asen is a iron altar that represents a visual connection between the living and the dead. Generally, there is one Asen for each ancestor.

There is usually a direct representation to the deceased's profession, religious affilation, and/or family role in the Asen. This asen. Africa, Vodun Sculpture - Fon People - Benin, Mid. 20th C., Wood, padlocks, clay pots, x 12 x 13 inches, Af VODUN, VODOU, CONURE: THE ANIMISTIC ARTS OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA MARCH 26 - MAY 2, Her publications include "Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics, and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey" (University of Virginia Press, ); "ASEN: Iron Altars of the Fon People of Benin" (Emory, ); editor of "Women and Work in Africa" (Westview, ); and co-editor of "Women in Africa: Studies in Social and Economic Change" (Stanford.

Londres: Saffron Books,p. ÉAU. Etienne, «L’art africain au musée des Arts d’Afrique et d’Océanie: collections et perspectives pour le musée du quai Branly», Cahiers d’Études africaines, vol. 39, n., p. ‑ F. ELIX. Marc Leo, Mwana. The Fon people are the largest ethnic group of Benin, and make up 39% of an estimated population of 10 million inhabitants.

This ethnicity is mainly settled in the area around Abomey, capital of the ancient kingdom of Danxomé (Danhomè), in central Benin, but there are also large Fon communities in the South. We look at the marriage celebration.The Fon people, of the Rep.

of Benin had iron and brass "asen" staffs commemorating kings which were displayed in royal compounds, validating their authority and lineage. Small figural groups of ther kings with attendants adorn the top round platforms.Pair glass top tables with gilt iron bases.

Copper free form artisan made table. Oriental rug 12'4" x 9'1" Iron traveling Altar / staff “Asen” from Fon people of Benin, Africa. Iron traveling Altar / staff “Asen” from Fon people of Benin, Africa. South African fabric vessel. Carved wood angels.

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